rss_2.0Mineralogia FeedSciendo RSS Feed for Mineralogiahttps://sciendo.com/journal/MIPOhttps://www.sciendo.comMineralogia 's Coverhttps://sciendo-parsed-data-feed.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/6006dc09fd113962cb049373/cover-image.jpg?X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&X-Amz-Date=20220522T075342Z&X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&X-Amz-Expires=604800&X-Amz-Credential=AKIA6AP2G7AKDOZOEZ7H%2F20220522%2Feu-central-1%2Fs3%2Faws4_request&X-Amz-Signature=0f77ffb5c909fb7a15db663e12709dccb6e98341cdd5b2607e04e27d5330c6a4200300New minerals and the first mineral occurrences in the Kupferschiefer (U, REE, HgS, chloride minerals PtAs, Pt(Sb,Bi), PtBi), Poland, and their genetic meaninghttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2021-0004<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Main U minerals in the Lubin and Polkowice mines in decreasing order of abundance are: uraninite, brannerite, metazunerite, metauranospinite, uranospinite, thucholite, monazite-huttonite, coffinite, and becquerelite. All these minerals are associated mainly with noble metal mineralization at the redox interfaces. Main minerals of REE are: (i) brannerite, monazite-huttonite in Noble Metals Bearing Shale (NMBS), (ii) florencite in Mo-Re shales and (iii) minor phospates in Cu-black shales derived from oxidation of organic matter. The latter, however, are controlling no more than 1/5 of the REE budget. Chloride minerals and sulphates are ubiquitous phases associated with Cu sulphides. They are represented by chlorargylite, cotunnite and penfieldite. Halite and sylvite form cubic inclusions in gypsum, up to 3 mm in chevrel compound, where they occur together with thiosulphates, anna-bergite and erithrite and Ni-Co-diarsenides. Sylvite is most common in lensoidal accumulations of semi massive kaolinite + chalcocite + gypsum at the contact between black shale and the top part of white sandstone. Such lenses have been traced over a distance of up to 30 m in the Lubin West and Polkowice East mines. Sylvite and halite have been so far overlooked during investigations of the Kupferschiefer because of applying standard cuƫng and polishing procedures using water as a lubricant. The Au content in native gold may reach exceptionally up to 97.40 wt% in a dolomitic reef from the Lubin West Mine. Gold forms four characteristic micro to nano-textures. Organic matrix of thucholite indicates correlation of Pt-Ni-V suggesting substitution of Pt in tetrapyrrole ring. Sperrylite, geversite and insizwaite appear at the western perimeter of Cu-sulphide deposit, where the redox gradient is so strong that almost all organic matter is gone. Platinum has forms its own minerals trapped in microfractures in anilite-digenite-spionkopite-yarrowite-bornite composite grains present in the reddened NMBS. Celestine-barite solid solution is one of the main accessory minerals in the Kupferschiefer. It has Sr/Ba ratio around 2.5 and 7.5. Euhedral uraninite associated with celestine-barite yielded U/Pb age of 84 ± 1 Ma, based on four grains measurements.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2022-02-27T00:00:00.000+00:00Evidence of amorphous Ca-phosphate precipitate caused by bio mineralisation in 4-5 CE lime plasters of the previously submerged east coastal monument of Salvankuppamhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2021-0003<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The lime plasters of the excavated monument of Salvankuppam, previously submerged and exposed by the Tsunami occurred in the Indian Ocean on 26<sup>th</sup> December 2004 was studied with different analytical techniques. The temple is dated 4-5<sup>th</sup> century CE. The XRF, XRD, FTIR, NMR, SEM-EDX analysis of the lime plasters evidenced particular occurrence of phosphatised bacterial remains in saline conditions. The formation of amorphous Ca-phosphate by bio mineralization was identified in the plasters by the analyses. The plasters are made of air-lime with coarse aggregates and seashells inclusion as confirmed by the thermal and chemical analysis. The microstructure and morphological investigations of mineralized microbial structures by SEM-EDX indicated the formation of amorphous Ca-phosphate. The unordered and fibrous spherulites have hardened and reduced porosity of the plaster by bio mineralization as observed through MIP analysis. The 16S rRNA sequencing has identified the Pseudomonas strains mainly responsible for the clustering of amorphous Ca-phosphate particles around the bacterial colony.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2022-02-18T00:00:00.000+00:00Developing teamwork skills in a course on ore depositshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2021-0005<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Teamwork has distinct pedagogic advantages and is also an important transferable skill and the dominant mode of work graduates encounter in the workplace. However, students rarely become proficient in teamwork skills during their education. The goal was to test strategies to improve teamwork skills in a course on Ores deposits, MSc Earth Science, Uppsala University. A focus on team-work was established by presenting the collaborative practicals as a series of linked opportunities to work together, get feedback on the teamwork process and reflect on and evaluate the teamwork. During the collaborative PBL sessions sociograms were used to provide feedback. Criteria based evaluation was also used to evaluate task oriented and interpersonal skills. Sociograms and criteria based evaluation promoted behavioural changes that improved teamwork interactions.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2022-02-18T00:00:00.000+00:00Mesoarchean melt and fluid inclusions in garnet from the Kangerlussuaq basement, Southeast Greenlandhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2022-0001<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The present work reports the first anatectic melt inclusions found so far in the Mesoarchean basement in East Greenland. Using optical microscope observations and MicroRaman spectroscopy, we show that garnets in metasedimentary migmatite contain primary polycrystalline aggregates which can be confidently interpreted as former droplets of anatectic melt, i.e. nanogranitoids. In some cases, they coexist with coeval fluid inclusions under conditions of primary fluid-melt immiscibility. The re-evaluation of the metamorphic pressure and temperature conditions with up-to-date phase equilibria modelling, combined with the identification of nanogranitoids and fluid inclusions, suggests metamorphic peak equilibration and partial melting in presence of a COH-fluid at T ~1000°C and P &gt; 7 kbar. To date, this is the oldest verified occurrence of nanogranitoids and fluid-melt immiscibility during garnet growth in a partially molten environment.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2022-02-14T00:00:00.000+00:00Mineralogical studies of the Maastrichtian Gerinya Claystone of the Patti Formation, southern Bida Basin, Nigeria: Implication for industrial applicationhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2021-0002<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The mineralogical compositions of the Gerinya claystone, Patti Formation, Southern Bida Basin, Nigeria, were investigated to infer their sedimentological process and industrial application. Mineralogical analysis of the claystone was carried out using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The diffractogram peaks aided the identification of the clay and non-clay minerals in the study area. The XRD showed kaolinite as the major clay mineral with compositions ranging from 10.8 - 67.6 wt%. The non-clay minerals were quartz, anatase, diopside, goethite, hematite, rutile, muscovite and micro-cline. Among the non-clay minerals, quartz had the highest percentage mineralogical composition of 21.2 to 83.4 wt%. The mineral assemblage is typical of a hot and humid climate where chemical alteration and hydrolysis of silicate minerals are severe. The sediments are of mafic and felsic crystalline rocks origin. The sediments are of low energy floodplain/interchannel depositional environment. The Gerinya claystone vary from low to high porosity and very low to low permeability. The claystone can be used as clay liners and as raw material for ceramic production. The application of the claystones in fertiliser production will require some processing. The clay-stone can be used for haemorrhage control in the pharmacological/medical sector. Although, the ingestion of the clay-stones could lead to dental damage and possible perforation of the sigmoid colon in the gastrointestinal tract.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2021-12-31T00:00:00.000+00:00Simple steps for the detection and classification of different lamprophyric rocks: a case study from Greecehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2021-0001<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This study aims to help non-expert geologists in locating, classifying and analyzing lamprophyres, the exotic and complex rocks. The process includes three basic steps, a macroscopic study of the formation, petrographic microscopy and lastly whole-rock and trace element analyses of the samples. Fourteen Greek lamprophyric rocks with distinct characteristics were used. Conventional lamprophyres were considered along with rarer alkali minettes, meta-lamprophyres, lamproschists, appinites and para-lamproites.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2021-11-03T00:00:00.000+00:00Sorption of oil products on the synthetic zeolite granuleshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2020-0001<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>In this work, lightweight granules of zeolite Na-P1 based on expanded glass aggregates were synthesized for the application in oil products’ sorption. The sorption of gasoline, diesel and silicone oil tests were also conducted for raw expanded glass, zeolite A, clinoptilolite and mineral sorbent available at a fuel station. All sorbents were also characterized in terms of the phase composition (X-ray diffraction) and structure (infrared spectroscopy). The zeolite Na-P1 granules achieved the highest values of sorption capacities (1.8, 2.1 and 2.6 g/g, respectively), which makes them promising materials for oils’ removal.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2020-10-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Analysis of selected mineral and waste sorbents for the capture of elemental mercury from exhaust gaseshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2020-0003<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Several mineralogically, chemically and texturally diverse minerals and waste materials were selected for the testing of elemental mercury capture in exhaust gas, namely tyre char resulting from the burning of pyrolytic rubber tyres, class C fly ash, mesoporous material type MCM-41 and glauconite. Each material’s mineralogical, chemical and textural characteristics were explored. In order to conduct experiments in conditions similar to those during the contact of sorbent with real coal exhaust fumes at a temperature of about 110-120°C, the experiments were carried out using a test device consisting of a furnace for burning powdered coals, a thermostatic cage for sorbent reactors and mercury gas analysers, which are able to measure and compare the effects of individual sorbents with exhaust gas. The study found that the best results for mercury sorption in the exhaust atmosphere were obtained for class C ash resulting from brown coal combustion.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2020-10-31T00:00:00.000+00:00The effect of porosity on the reactivity of calcium sorbentshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2020-0004<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The current work presents the results of seven sorbent samples investigated with respect to SO<sub>2</sub> capture. The sorbents’ reactivity and capacity indexes were determined, and the tests were carried out in accordance with the ‘classical’ procedure for limestone sorbents. The reactivity indexes (RIs) of the tested samples were in the range of 2.57 and 3.55 (mol Ca)/(mol S), while the absolute sorption coefficients as determined by the capacity index (CI) varied between 87.9 and 120.6 (g S)/(kg of sorbent). Porosimetric analysis was also carried out and the specific surface area of the samples was found to be between 0.2 and 1.7 m<sup>2</sup>/g. The number of micro-, meso- and macro-pores in individual samples was determined from the corresponding pore size distribution histograms, and the values of sorbent RIs and CIs were correlated with the samples’ total porosity and specific surface.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2020-10-27T00:00:00.000+00:00Activated Carbon as a Support of Catalysts for the Removal of Nitrogen Oxideshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2020-0002<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Activated carbon was oxidised with concentrated nitric acid and impregnated with urea to form nitrogen-containing groups. Such a support was impregnated with cobalt, copper or silver nitrates to obtain catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia. Infrared spectra confirmed the formation of carboxylic and other organic oxygen-containing groups during oxidation. Nitrogen-containing species resulted from urea thermal decomposition. The metal-containing samples were hydrophilic. Cobalt and copper were present in the samples as small Co<sub>3</sub>O<sub>4</sub> and CuO crystallites, while silver occurred in the form of large metallic crystallites, as seen from the X-ray diffraction patterns. Low temperature N<sub>2</sub> sorption revealed that all samples were microporous solids, and the chemical and thermal treatment did not change their textural properties. The copper admixture caused the highest NO conversion, but worsened the selectivity and thermal stability of functionalised carbon support.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2020-10-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Synthesis and application of natural sorbents with silver nanoparticles in reducing the emission of odourshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/mipo-2020-0005<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The paper concerns the applicability of silver nanoparticles for reducing the emission of odours. Silver nanoparticles were successfully adsorbed on three different dolomitic limestone samples. In the next stage, wastewater from the meat industry was mixed with sorbents modified with a variable content of silver nanoparticles. After 4 days and 7 days, the concentration of ammonia was examined spectrophotometrically. Also, the degree of reduction of total odour concentration by olfactometric method was carried out. Depending on the concentration of the silver nanoparticles on the sorbents, the concentration of ammonia was 15-42 μg/cm<sup>3</sup> for nAg content equal to 0.08%, while for sorbents containing approximately 36% of nAg the concentration of ammonia was 0.09-16 μg/cm<sup>3</sup>. A leaching test of nanosilver from sorbents confirmed that the particles were bound with the sorbents by strong bonds. The percentage of eluted silver increased from 0.67% to 11%, with increased initial concentrations of nAg on the sorbents from 0.18% to 0.37%.</p> </abstract>ARTICLE2020-12-16T00:00:00.000+00:00Włodzimierz Wojciech Kowalski 1932-2005https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0007-8<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Włodzimierz Wojciech Kowalski 1932-2005</title></abstract>ARTICLE2007-02-05T00:00:00.000+00:00Low-Grade Metamorphism of Permian Mafic Rocks From the Gorzów Wielkopolski Block (Fore Sudetic Monocline, Nw Poland): Age and Mechanismhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0004-y<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Low-Grade Metamorphism of Permian Mafic Rocks From the Gorzów Wielkopolski Block (Fore Sudetic Monocline, Nw Poland): Age and Mechanism</title><p>The metavolcanic rocks in the Gorzów Wielkopolski area (NW Poland) are andesite-basalts and andesites derived from contaminated within-plate subalkaline basalt melts. K-Ar dating of primary K-feldspar yields an extrusion age of 285±5 Ma. This new date suggests that these rocks may be the youngest dated Permo-Carboniferous volcanic rocks within the eastern margin of the North German Basin.</p><p>Petrological and micro-thermometric data indicate that the volcanic rocks were altered by a sub-greenschist facies, metamorphic process that proceeded within temperatures and pressures ranging from 195-290°C and 63-96 MPa, respectively. The major metamorphic phases, corrensite, pumpellyite, laumontite and prehnite, formed due to interaction between the original volcanic rock and low-saline Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub>-rich hydrothermal fluids. Numerical modelling indicates fluid flow in fractures as the most probable explanation for the low-grade hydrothermal metamorphism. Model calculations suggest that the process was of short duration, <italic>ca</italic> 140-250 years. K-Ar dating reveals three Mesozoic episodes at 121±2 Ma, 188-190 Ma and 149±4 Ma that can be ascribed to the metamorphism. These ages are similar to previously determined Mesozoic ages from altered volcanic- and clastic rocks in the North German Basin and in the Polish Basin.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2007-02-05T00:00:00.000+00:00Monazite Breakdown in Metapelites From Wedel Jarlsberg Land, Svalbard — Preliminary Reporthttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0006-9<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Monazite Breakdown in Metapelites From Wedel Jarlsberg Land, Svalbard — Preliminary Report</title><p>Metapelites from the SW part of Wedel Jarlsberg Land were progressively metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions followed by a Caledonian low-temperature metamorphic event under greenschist facies conditions. The latter resulted in various stages of monazite breakdown. These include monazite alterations and the formation of allanite-apatite coronas.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2007-02-05T00:00:00.000+00:00Zygmunt Holcer 10.11.1925-17.07.2004https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0008-7<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Zygmunt Holcer 10.11.1925-17.07.2004</title></abstract>ARTICLE2007-02-05T00:00:00.000+00:00A Note on the Chemical Composition of Nuffieldite Solid-Solution From Sulphide Mineralizations in the Western Carpathians, Slovakiahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0005-x<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>A Note on the Chemical Composition of Nuffieldite Solid-Solution From Sulphide Mineralizations in the Western Carpathians, Slovakia</title><p>The chemistry of the rare sulphosalt nuffieldite from three localities in Slovakia is examined. Nuffieldite is a part of a complex association of Bi sulphosalts accompanying tetrahedrite mineralization in some sulphide deposits in the Western Carpathians. Cu + Pb = (Bi, Sb) + vac. substitution in nuffieldite and the general formula Cu<sub>1+x</sub>Pb<sub>2</sub>Bi<sub>2</sub>(Pb<sub>x</sub>Sb<sub>y</sub>Bi<sub>1-x-y</sub>)S<sub>7</sub> where 0 &lt; x &lt; 0.34; and 0.32 &lt; y &lt; 0.45 are confirmed. Decreasing Sb content with increasing copper content indicates a predominant substitution of Bi by Sb in nuffieldite.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2007-02-05T00:00:00.000+00:00Dovyrenite CaZr[SiO](OH) - A New Mineral from Skarned Carbonate Xenoliths in Basic-Ultrabasic Rocks of the Ioko-Dovyren Massif, Northern Baikal Region, Russiahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0012-y<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Dovyrenite Ca<sub>6</sub>Zr[Si<sub>2</sub>O<sub>7</sub>]<sub>2</sub>(OH)<sub>4</sub> - A New Mineral from Skarned Carbonate Xenoliths in Basic-Ultrabasic Rocks of the Ioko-Dovyren Massif, Northern Baikal Region, Russia</title><p>Dovyrenite, simplified formula Ca<sub>6</sub>Zr[Si<sub>2</sub>O<sub>7</sub>]<sub>2</sub>(OH)<sub>4</sub>, occurs as an accessory mineral in vein skarns developed in carbonate xenoliths in subvolcanic layered plagiodunite-troctolite series in the Ioko-Dovyren Massif of Proterozoic age, Northern Baikal Region, Buryatia, Russia. Dovyrenite is a late mineral of altered pyroxene and melilite-monticellite skarns. Associated minerals are Zr-bearing phases: fassaitic pyroxene, perovskite and hydrogarnets; and also monticellite, vesuvianite, diopside, foshagite, brucite, calzirtite, tazheranite, baghdadite, apatite, calcite, native bismuth, sphalerite, selenian galena, clausthalite, safflorite, rammelsbergite, pyrrhotite, pentlandite, valleriite, laitakarite, nickeline, nickel-skutterudite. The average structure of dovyrenite is orthorhombic, space group <italic>Pnnm</italic>, with subcell parameters <italic>A</italic> = 5.666(16) Å, <italic>B</italic> = 18.844(5) Å, <italic>C</italic> = 3.728(11) Å, <italic>V</italic> = 398.0(2) Å<sup>3</sup> and <italic>Z</italic> = 1. Dovyrenite shows a new type of modular structure with stacking of the tobermorite-like and the rosenbuschite-like layers parallel to (010). Single-crystal structural data point to an incompletely occupied Ca(2) site from the rosenbuschite module which is confirmed by microprobe analyses: ZrO<sub>2</sub> 16.47, SiO<sub>2</sub> 32.83, TiO<sub>2</sub> 0.14, HfO<sub>2</sub> 0.16, Cr<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> 0.01, CaO 43.87, FeO 0.25, MgO 0.13, MnO 0.02, Nb<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> 0.03; total 99.38 wt% with calculated H<sub>2</sub>O. The empirical formula is (Ca<sub>5.73</sub>Fe<sub>0.03</sub>Mg<sub>0.02</sub>)<sub>σ5.78</sub>(Zr<sub>0.98</sub>Hf<sub>0.01</sub>Ti<sub>0.01</sub>)<sub>σ1</sub>Si<sub>4</sub>(O<sub>13.56</sub>OH<sub>0.44</sub>)<sub>σ14</sub>(OH)<sub>4</sub>. The presence of two types of OH group in the dovyrenite structure is corroborated by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Dovyrenite is an optically positive biaxial mineral: α 1.659(2), β 1.660(2); γ 1.676(2); 2Vz 30(5)° (measured), 28° (calculated). The coexistence of monticellite, foshagite and dovyrenite points to a narrow interval of crystallization 560-630°C under subvolcanic conditions (P &lt; 10<sup>8</sup> Pa).</p></abstract>ARTICLE2007-07-03T00:00:00.000+00:00Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Nižná Boca Sb-Au Hydrothermal Ore Deposit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0019-4<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Nižná Boca Sb-Au Hydrothermal Ore Deposit (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)</title><p>Samples from hydrothermal Sb-Au mineralization in the area SE of Nižná Boca village in the N&amp;iAzke Tatry Mountains were investigated using a variety of geochemical and mineralogical methods. Ore minerals typically occur in N-S striking quartz-carbonate veins hosted by an I-type biotite granodiorite to tonalite of Variscan Age (the Ďumbier Type). Paragenetic associations in the deposit are comparable to other mineralizations of the same type in the Ďumbierske Nízke Tatry Mountains. A quartz-arsenopyrite, pyrite stage of mineralization is the oldest with a calculated temperature of formation of about 445°C. It is followed by a quartz-carbonate-stibnite, zinkenite stage and, in turn, a quartz-carbonate-sphalerite-galena, boulangerite-gold stage. The gold typically contains between 9-18 wt.% Ag regardless of mineral association. No evidence for further generations of gold was found although it is possible that some gold was remobilized from the structure of the auriferous arsenopyrite. The Au and Ag content of the bulk ore ranges from 0.53 g.t<sup>-1</sup> to 20.2 g.t<sup>-1</sup> and from 0.9 g.t<sup>-1</sup> to 31.2 g.t<sup>-1</sup>, respectively. A tetrahedrite-chalcopyrite stage is followed by a barite-hematite stage - the youngest assemblage in the deposit. Fluid inclusions from the first mineralization stage are usually less than 3 μm in size and contain less than 3.6 wt.% CO<sub>2</sub>; salinity, density and homogenization temperature range from 2.7-16.3 wt.% NaCl<sub>(eq)</sub>, 0.85-1.03 g.cm<sup>-1</sup> and 128-280°C, respectively.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2008-03-27T00:00:00.000+00:00Ree and Sr-Nd Isotope Compositions of Clinopyroxenites, Phoscorites and Carbonatites of the Seblyavr Massif, Kola Peninsula, Russiahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-007-0017-6<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Ree and Sr-Nd Isotope Compositions of Clinopyroxenites, Phoscorites and Carbonatites of the Seblyavr Massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia</title><p>Clinopyroxenites, phoscorites and carbonatites from the Devonian Seblyavr intrusion (Kola Peninsula, Russia) have petrographic characteristics indicating that they are accumulative in origin. Their geochemical (major and rare earth elements) compositions can be accounted for by mixtures of their major rock-forming minerals and accessory phases, i.e. they reflect the record of mineral accumulation. All of the analysed Seblyavr rocks are strongly LREE-enriched with (La/Yb)<sub>N</sub> mostly ranging from 38 to 189. However, a dolomite carbonatite with hydrothermal LREE-Sr mineralization has an extreme (La/Yb)<sub>N</sub> value of 1659. Such late-stage dolomite carbonatites were formed by hydrothermal (rather than magmatic) processes. Whole-rock samples of representative magmatic lithologies from Seblyavr have initial <sup>87</sup>Sr/<sup>86</sup>Sr and ε<sub>Nd</sub> that fall in a very narrow range from 0.7031 to 0.7033 and +4.9 to +5.9, respectively. We therefore conclude that clinopyroxenites, phoscorites and carbonatites were formed by differentiation and crystallization of a single batch of melt. The parental melt was derived from a depleted upper mantle source that had been meta-somatised prior to melting.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2008-01-28T00:00:00.000+00:00Mineralogy and petrology serving society: challenges for the 21st centuryhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/v10002-009-0005-0<abstract xml:lang="en"><title style='display:none'>Mineralogy and petrology serving society: challenges for the 21st century</title><p>One of the topical problems of science in general at present is spreading the newest discoveries among population as well as among the decision-makers. "Mineralogical sciences" (mineralogy, geochemistry, petrology) affect the wide spectrum of human activities. Such an influence can already be traced in prehistory, and in the modern age the significance of the mentioned geoscience branches is on the increase. The author presents here a review of selected applications of mineralogical sciences in the development of mankind.</p></abstract>ARTICLE2010-05-04T00:00:00.000+00:00en-us-1