rss_2.0Conjunctions FeedSciendo RSS Feed for Conjunctionshttps://sciendo.com/journal/TJCPhttps://www.sciendo.comConjunctions Feedhttps://sciendo-parsed.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/660ee1c31ae47050093cffaf/cover-image.jpghttps://sciendo.com/journal/TJCP140216Editorial: Experiencing participationhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0001ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00012024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Out of time: The experience of contrasting temporal frameworks in participatory arthttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0007<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Participatory art turns the artwork into a process of engagement and co-creation, and it thus involves forms of time-based coordination that influence the experience of creating participatory art. In this paper I argue that participatory art is underscored by two contrasting temporal frameworks. One is the framework of long-term durational approaches that have been internalized among artists as an ethical and political obligation toward participants; the other is the short-term temporary framework that typically comes with project funding and steers the project toward delivery of target outcomes. To show the tensions to which these contrasting temporal frameworks can give rise, I analyze the development of a participatory art project in Copenhagen’s South Harbor. Specifically, the analysis emphasizes how tensions arose in respect to delimitations of project aspects such as who constitutes the creative team, what is the task before us, and what is our expected contribution to the community. By emphasizing the tensions arising from contrasting temporal frameworks, the article contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the experience of creating participatory art, and to problematizing the question of time for participatory art.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00072024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00The neighborhood assembly in the art museum: Practicing cultural citizenshiphttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0003<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The crisis of democracy calls upon public art museums to reflect on what is expected from them as public spaces. This article investigates the art museum as an engaged political participant in its local surroundings and the neighborhood assembly as the platform of this participation. Through original interviews with museum professionals, the article examines three examples of museum-based neighborhood assemblies in different geographical contexts: the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (Spain), Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende (Chile), and Whitechapel Gallery (UK). Drawing on political theory to analyze the horizontal, discursive, and performative features of these practices, the article examines their democratic potential and limitations. The argument is put forward that the neighborhood assembly functions as a practice of participatory cultural citizenship, whereby the art museum can enter a space of co-authorship of the local cultural environment with the local constituents and can be a participant among many.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00032024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Participation and affect intertwined: Linking participatory experiences and affective intensities in a collaborative craft-based art projecthttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0006<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This article investigates the collaborative craft-based art project Data Mirror, launched by the Trapholt Museum of Art and Design in Denmark in March 2022 with artist and weaver Astrid Skibsted. Through the lens of affect theory (Massumi, 2002, 2009), the article explores how the textile making practice and the materials in <italic>Data Mirror</italic> affected the participatory experience. Building on Christopher Kelty’s understanding of participation as strung between individuality and collectivity, the article argues that the experience of participation in <italic>Data Mirror</italic> is in fact “more than individual,” but not only in the sense defined by Kelty of being “both individual and collective at the same time” (2019, p. 18). Over and above this, the participatory experience is also about connecting with and being moved affectively by materials, tools, and – in the <italic>Data Mirror</italic> case – artistic dogmas. The aim of the article is both analytical and theoretical. Based on a close analysis of (1) material intensities and embodied experiences of stitching and (2) felt potential and creative capacity, it calls for a more embodied, material, and affective understanding of the horizontal and vertical (Eriksson, 2019; Kelty, 2016) dimensions of participation.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00062024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Visitor voices in the museum space: sharing art experiences as a dialogic mode in museum communicationhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0004<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The article takes its point of departure in an experiment conducted at Randers Art Museum, Denmark, in which museum visitors were asked to comment on their experiences with artworks from the museum’s collection. Their comments that were subsequently shared by the museum in the exhibition space.</p> <p>By examining dialogue as a form of participation, the author analyses and discusses how this particular participatory experiment created a dialogical and polyphonic museum experience in which the institutional voice was complemented and even challenged.</p> <p>The article contributes to the field of research on participation by connecting theoretical and practical levels through an experimental methodological approach. It presents concrete recommendations for enhancing visitor-oriented and dialogical strategies in museum communication. Moreover, it demonstrates that the experimental approach can be very useful for both researchers and museum professionals, as long as they reflect on both the limitations and the possibilities of specific experiments like this one.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00042024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Cards on the Table: Critical reflections on a participatory research methodhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0008<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This article critically reflects on the limitations and challenges of using Cards on the Table (COTT), a participatory research method used to evaluate experiences of participation in art projects. The focus of this article is on the application of COTT as part of our evaluation of BE PART, a four-year Creative Europe Program of the European Union that ran from 2019 to 2023. The COTT method is informed by community research and participation action research, but here we highlight the ambiguous and messy nature of researching with such a broad and varied network of communities. We illustrate the tension between our desire to research in a co-productive, community-led, and action-oriented way and the realities of conducting research with a vast network of participants and limited time and budget.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00082024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00“Never enough, never perfect”: Participatory activist practice in the museumhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0002<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Recent outbursts of activist interventions in museums have put a spotlight on the difficult relationship of cultural spaces with activism as they aspire to be forums, sites for civil, social, and cultural participation (Black, 2005; Byrne, 2018; Janes &amp; Sandell, 2019; Pegno, 2021). On the one hand, museums want to be engaged and relevant, taking part in social dialogue as “agents of change” (Mouffe, 2016; Sandell, 2003). On the other, they often have complex relationships with the activists themselves, especially in the framework of participatory practices (Coffee, 2008; Lorente, 2015). This article focuses on the process of co-creation of an exhibition about the social history of AIDS at the Museum of Civilizations of Europe and the Mediterranean (the Mucem) in Marseille, France, and explores how this participatory project involving activists can help us better understand the challenges of museum activism. The core question this article addresses is: how did activists experience the co-creation participatory process, and what can the museum learn from it to inform their practice of museum activism?</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00022024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Tokenistic behavior? Exploring Blockchain and DAOs as a participatory practice in museumshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-0005<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The paper examines the possibilities offered by decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs) for supporting audience participation in the museum sector . DAOs, a type of digital infrastructure underpinned by blockchains and smart contracts, have been seen as informing a more autonomous, self-managing, transparent, and more efficient online organization, one capable of shaping how users participate and communicate with one another. At the same time significant questions have been raised over how DAO technologies complicate the human issues of democracy and shared authority. This paper explores and evaluates the impact of DAO structures in the context of museum participation, specifically viewing them through the lens of shared authority and democracy. It argues that these technologies are capable of offering evidence-based participation, but that this is contingent on access and trust.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2024-00052024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Out of time: The experience of contrasting temporal frameworks in participatory arthttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0007<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Participatory art turns the artwork into a process of engagement and co-creation, and it thus involves forms of time-based coordination that influence the experience of creating participatory art. In this paper I argue that participatory art is underscored by two contrasting temporal frameworks. One is the framework of long-term durational approaches that have been internalized among artists as an ethical and political obligation toward participants; the other is the short-term temporary framework that typically comes with project funding and steers the project toward delivery of target outcomes. To show the tensions to which these contrasting temporal frameworks can give rise, I analyze the development of a participatory art project in Copenhagen’s South Harbor. Specifically, the analysis emphasizes how tensions arose in respect to delimitations of project aspects such as who constitutes the creative team, what is the task before us, and what is our expected contribution to the community. By emphasizing the tensions arising from contrasting temporal frameworks, the article contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the experience of creating participatory art, and to problematizing the question of time for participatory art.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00072024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Cards on the Table: Critical reflections on a participatory research methodhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0008<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This article critically reflects on the limitations and challenges of using Cards on the Table (COTT), a participatory research method used to evaluate experiences of participation in art projects. The focus of this article is on the application of COTT as part of our evaluation of BE PART, a four-year Creative Europe Program of the European Union that ran from 2019 to 2023. The COTT method is informed by community research and participation action research, but here we highlight the ambiguous and messy nature of researching with such a broad and varied network of communities. We illustrate the tension between our desire to research in a co-productive, community-led, and action-oriented way and the realities of conducting research with a vast network of participants and limited time and budget.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00082024-04-04T00:00:00.000+00:00Academic habitats? An essay on research ethicshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0004<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>In this essay, I experiment with Lauren Berlant’s idea of ‘cruel optimism’ to explore how policies specifying responsible conduct of research within academia have effects that extend beyond efforts at establishing an untarnished university. Based on a feminist ethics of care, alongside experiences from teaching PhD students about research integrity and ethics, I unpack how culpability, vigilance and powerlessness surface. In this essay I then speculate: what would it entail to care? I suggest that there is a need to consider research ethics as an ethics that cares both for and about the university as a habitat1. </p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00042023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00Editorial foreword: Challenging academic participationhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0001ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00012023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00This is not ‘interesting’ research: Authentically Co-Creating Participatory Action Research in UK’s Post-Covid Culture Industries https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0003<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This essay explores methodological, ethical, and practical aspects of authentically co-creating participatory action research (PAR) in post-Covid 19 participatory arts contexts in the UK. It analyses the limits and possibilities of PAR methods into leadership pathways in the UK’s arts and culture sector. In critical dialogue with decolonial and intersectional frameworks that seek to challenge and transform institutionalised privilege in the wake of the Covid pandemic, we investigate the financialisation of participatory strategies of cultural co-creation, with a particular focus on questions of racial and class dynamics in the arts. This essay develops a decolonial political ontology of PAR through a critique of both authenticity and its financialisation in participatory action research projects. Drawing on recent critical analyses of ‘post-extractivism’ and ‘co-creation’ in participatory research, we suggest that the recent financialisation of ‘impactful’ participation is an increasingly important but neglected ‘matter of concern’ for critical PAR methodologies.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00032023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00Radio of Flesh and Bone: Community Radio in the Authoritarian and Patriarchal Context of Today’s Nicaraguahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0006<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>In <italic>A Passion for Radio: Training of Trainers</italic> José Ignacio López Vigil asserts that community radio “is (made) of flesh and bone” (2015, p. 25). In the context of authoritarianism and patriarchy in today’s Nicaragua these words suggest at least three meanings. One recalls threats to the lives and livelihoods of Nicaraguans that work for Nicaragua’s surviving independent media, including community radio, particularly following the political and humanitarian crisis that began in April 2018. Community radio as “flesh and bone” also relates to the bodies of its listening public and is examined in this paper through the prism of the feminist community radio station, Radio Vos (Radio You 101.7 FM). Radio as “flesh and bone” also serves as a metaphor for community radio’s material and operational existence, a body that functions via multiple interworking parts and systems. In discussing the challenges facing community radio in Nicaragua, this essay incorporates excerpts from an interview with Argentina Olivas, the director of <italic>Radio Vos</italic>.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00062023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00How participatory are we really? The pitfalls and potentials of participatory research practiceshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0002<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The development of participatory research practices has been linked to high hopes of creating more relevant, socially robust, and democratic forms of academic knowledge. Researchers have, however, also pointed to a discrepancy between the ideals and realities of participation, in research and elsewhere. This paper uses these critiques of participation to unfold the dilemmas of two participatory projects: <italic>RECcORD: Rethinking European Cultural Centers in a European Dimension</italic> (2015-17) and <italic>Participate: Citizen Participation in Danish Cultural Centers</italic> (2019-23). Both projects approached participation as a method that involved co-researching participants from cultural centers, and as a practice to be explored while unfolding in the centers. This paper critically discusses the methodologies of the projects by developing an evaluative framework that highlights both the participatory potentials and pitfalls of the two processes. This transferable framework is based on the concepts of ‘unpredictability’, ‘friction’, ‘autonomy’, ‘inequality’, ‘failure’, and ‘scale’. </p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00022023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00Activist Participation in Academic Systems Three autoethnographic case studies of academic-activist positions in knowledge-workhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-0005<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Based on three autoethnographic cases, this article reflects on activist participation in academic systems. The three authors are activists with different attachments to and experiences of academic knowledge-work. Our experiences as activists in academia help us form the argument that many activist contributions to academic systems remain unacknowledged. We are using these overlooked cases to expand existing participatory and activist/action research that often assumes a preliminary distinction between activists and researchers. Instead, we pose critiques of participation that are neither internal (in the sense criticised by Cooke and Kothari) nor external, but formulated from positions in between as activist-academics. Our critiques of academic participation concern exploitation of student work in academic teaching, lack of acknowledgement of activist knowledge in research processes, and tendencies to dismiss activists as professional disseminators of academic knowledge.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2023-00052023-10-30T00:00:00.000+00:00Democratic Design Through Playhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-00012<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The theoretical paper explores the question how designers and children can interact as peer citizens in participatory design (PD) processes. By discussing and integrating Mouritsen’s (2002) concept of child culture, approaches to child-citizenship and concepts of free play, we discuss how participatory design practices could stimulate child and adult cultures to permeate each other and by doing so, enable democratic interactions. Both children and adults are required to step away from their internalized normative ways of interaction. Adult designers are invited to also play and improvise whereas children are encouraged to play, but also to share responsibility for the process and outcome of PD sessions. The Ambiguity Approach (Vaneycken, 2020) is introduced as a methodological basis for more democratic PD practice with children. Two snapshots of PD processes illustrate the implementation of ambiguity of roles and ambiguity of materials respectively.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-000122022-11-01T00:00:00.000+00:00Multilingual Children’s Mathematical Engagement with Apps: What Can Be Learned from Multilingual Children’s Mathematical and Playful Participation when Interacting with Two Different Apps?https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-0009<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The use of digital tools is becoming increasingly common in early childhood education. One key to using digital tools to enhance learning in children may lie in using them the way children tend to when given the choice: as play. This article examines and evaluates multilingual children’s mathematical engagement with digital apps, focusing specifically on what might be learned from multilingual children’s mathematical and playful participation when interacting with two different apps. Mathematical engagement is here defined by Alan Bishop’s six mathematical activities: counting, measuring, locating, designing, playing and explaining. Helenius et al.’s elaboration of mathematical play is used to connect the mathematical play to the play of children. Multilingual children’s interactions with digital apps have been video recorded in natural settings in a kindergarten. The findings show that playful digital apps do promote the children’s participation in mathematical activities, while apps that aim to provide a formal learning structure seem to promote neither play nor mathematical activities.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-00092022-11-01T00:00:00.000+00:00Participatory digital gameplay narrative design for public space sustainability management: empirical research with primary school childrenhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-0008<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>This paper reports results of completed research with primary school children which took place in Athens, Greece. Children engaged in designing the play experience of digital mini-games corresponding to episodes/missions of an entire plot. The games were coded by the school teacher on low-end mobile phones using AppInventor and were then played by children designers and testers. The game plot concerned restoring management rules for a public space (an urban park), along sustainability principles. The results focused on the participation processes of children in critical game narrative design, and decision-making about public space management alternatives to embed in game narrative design.</p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-00082022-11-01T00:00:00.000+00:00Editorial introduction to Designing for Play as Cultural Production in Childhood. Seeking new grounds.https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-0007<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>In 2021 the BIN network (Børneforskere i Norden - [Children’s Culture Researchers in the Nordic Countries]) invited researchers from all over the world to meet in order to explore potential relationships and bridges between two research areas, childhood studies and design, that share an interest in play as a topic of research.</p> <p>The conference invited both practitioners and scholars to participate to empower and enrich a landscape for conversation and development in order for the areas to inspire each other. Over 400 people from all over the world participated in sessions during the two-day conference.</p> <p>Based on the conference, we invited authors to contribute to this special issue of Conjunctions. Transdisciplinary Journal of Cultural Participation with the title <italic>Designing for Play as Cultural Participation in Childhood. Seeking new grounds.</italic></p> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/tjcp-2022-00072022-11-01T00:00:00.000+00:00en-us-1