rss_2.0Journal of Translational Internal Medicine FeedSciendo RSS Feed for Journal of Translational Internal Medicinehttps://sciendo.com/journal/JTIMhttps://www.sciendo.comJournal of Translational Internal Medicine Feedhttps://sciendo-parsed-data-feed.s3.eu-central-1.amazonaws.com/6005ec20e797941b18f2b68b/cover-image.jpghttps://sciendo.com/journal/JTIM140216Noted tension headache, anxiety, and depression in a Chinese patient with spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 10 caused by a novel anoctamin 10 mutationhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0047ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00472023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Monkeypox: Clinical issues of concernhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0038ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00382023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00A comprehensive weighted gene co-expression network analysis uncovers potential targets in diabetic kidney diseasehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0053<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0053_s_005"><title style='display:none'>Background and Objectives</title> <p>Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes. It has always been difficult to explore novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets of DKD. We aimed to identify new biomarkers and further explore their functions in DKD.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0053_s_009"><title style='display:none'>Methods</title> <p>The weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) method was used to analyze the expression profile data of DKD, obtain key modules related to the clinical traits of DKD, and perform gene enrichment analysis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to verify the mRNA expression of the hub genes in DKD. Spearman’s correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between gene expression and clinical indicators.</p> </sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0053_s_007"><title style='display:none'>Results</title> <p>Fifteen gene modules were obtained <italic>via</italic> WGCNA analysis, among which the green module had the most significant correlation with DKD. Gene enrichment analysis revealed that the genes in this module were mainly involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, regulation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) mediated signal transduction, G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) molecular signaling pathway, Rho protein signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity. The qRT-PCR results showed that the relative expression of nuclear pore complex-interacting protein family member A2 (<italic>NPIPA2</italic>) and ankyrin repeat domain 36 (<italic>ANKRD36</italic>) was notably increased in DKD compared to the control. <italic>NPIPA2</italic> was positively correlated with the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine (Scr) but negatively correlated with albumin (ALB) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. <italic>ANKRD36</italic> was positively correlated with the triglyceride (TG) level and white blood cell (WBC) count.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0053_s_008"><title style='display:none'>Conclusion</title> <p><italic>NPIPA2</italic> expression is closely related to the disease condition of DKD, whereas <italic>ANKRD36</italic> may be involved in the progression of DKD through lipid metabolism and inflammation, providing an experimental basis to further explore the pathogenesis of DKD.</p></sec> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00532023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Antibiotic stewardship: Dead bugs do not mutatehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0059ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00592023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Cortical synaptic mechanism for chronic pain and anxiety in Parkinson’s diseasehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0046ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00462023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Chemical therapy for chronic pancreatitis: An assumption or an alternative?https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0034ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00342023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Interpretation of the key issues of expert consensus on immunomodulatory therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseasehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0069ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00692023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Gastric electrical stimulation: Overview and summaryhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0056ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00562023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Emerging noninvasive neuromodulation methods for functional gastrointestinal diseaseshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0060ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00602023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Focal liver lesions other than hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis: Diagnostic challengeshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0068<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Liver cirrhosis is associated with regenerative nodules and an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, other benign and malignant liver lesions may also occur. Differentiating the other lesions from HCC is important for further therapeutic decisions. This review discusses the characteristics of non-HCC liver lesions in cirrhosis and their consequent appearance on contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with consideration of other imaging. Knowledge of this data would be helpful in avoiding misdiagnoses.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00682023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Retraction note: Hydrogel: A promising new technique for treating Alzheimer’s disease (in Volume 10 Issue 3)https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0090ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00902023-01-13T00:00:00.000+00:00Characteristics of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 omicron BA.2 subvariant in Jilin, China from March to May 2022https://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0054<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0054_s_006"><title style='display:none'>Background and Objectives</title> <p>In the midst of the pandemic, new coronavirus mutants continue to emerge; the most relevant variant worldwide is omicron. Here, patients who recovered from the disease living in Jilin Province were analyzed to identify factors affecting the severity of omicron infection and to provide insights into its spread and early indication.</p> </sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0054_s_007"><title style='display:none'>Methods</title> <p>In this study, 311 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were divided into two groups. Data on the patients’ demographic characteristics and laboratory tests, including platelet count (PLT), neutrophil count (NE), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum creatinine (SCR), and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), were collected. The biomarkers for moderate and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and factors affecting the incubation period and time to subsequent negative nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) were also investigated.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0054_s_008"><title style='display:none'>Results</title> <p>Age, gender, vaccination, hypertension, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/chronic bronchitis/asthma, and some laboratory tests were statistically different between the two groups. In the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, PLT and CRP had higher area under the ROC curve values. In the multivariate analysis, age, hypertension, COPD/chronic bronchitis/asthma, and CRP were correlated with moderate and severe COVID-19. Moreover, age was correlated with longer incubation. In the Kaplan-Meier curve analysis, gender (male), CRP, and NLR were associated with longer time to subsequent negative NAAT.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0054_s_009"><title style='display:none'>Conclusions</title> <p>Older patients with hypertension and lung diseases were likely to have moderate or severe COVID-19, and younger patients might have a shorter incubation. A male patient with high CRP and NLR levels might take more time to turn back negative in the NAAT.</p></sec> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00542023-01-05T00:00:00.000+00:00The emergence of travel-related infections in critical care unitshttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0042<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Several tropical or geographically confined infectious diseases may lead to organ failure requiring management in an intensive care unit (ICU), both in endemic low- and middle-income countries where ICU facilities are increasingly being developed and in (nonendemic) high-income countries through an increase in international travel and migration. The ICU physician must know which of these diseases may be encountered and how to recognize, differentiate, and treat them. The four historically most prevalent “tropical” diseases (malaria, enteric fever, dengue, and rickettsiosis) can present with single or multiple organ failure in a very similar manner, which makes differentiation based solely on clinical signs very difficult. Specific but frequently subtle symptoms should be considered and related to the travel history of the patient, the geographic distribution of these diseases, and the incubation period. In the future, ICU physicians may also be more frequently confronted with rare but frequently lethal diseases, such as Ebola and other viral hemorrhagic fevers, leptospirosis, and yellow fever. No one could have foreseen the worldwide 2019–up to now coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which was initially spread by travel too. In addition, the actual pandemic due to SARS-CoV-2 reminds us of the actual and potential threat of (re)-emerging pathogens. If left untreated or when treated with a delay, many travel-related diseases remain an important cause of morbidity and even mortality, even when high-quality critical care is provided. Awareness and a high index of suspicion of these diseases is a key skill for the ICU physicians of today and tomorrow to develop.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00422022-11-23T00:00:00.000+00:00Oncogenic KRAS triggers metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0022<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title><p>Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with an extremely high lethality rate. Oncogenic KRAS activation has been proven to be a key driver of PDAC initiation and progression. There is increasing evidence that PDAC cells undergo extensive metabolic reprogramming to adapt to their extreme energy and biomass demands. Cell-intrinsic factors, such as <italic>KRAS</italic> mutations, are able to trigger metabolic rewriting. Here, we update recent advances in KRAS-driven metabolic reprogramming and the associated metabolic therapeutic potential in PDAC.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00222022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Impact of the Alberta Stroke Program CT Score subregions on long-term functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke: Results from two multicenter studies in Chinahttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0057<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0057_s_005"> <title style='display:none'>Background and Objectives</title> <p>The Alberta Stroke Program CT Score (ASPECTS) is a widely used rating system for assessing infarct extent and location. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of ASPECTS subregions’ involvement in the long-term functional outcomes of acute ischemic stroke (AIS).</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0057_s_006"> <title style='display:none'>Materials and Methods</title> <p>Consecutive patients with AIS and anterior circulation large-vessel stenosis and occlusion between January 2019 and December 2020 were included. The ASPECTS score and subregion involvement for each patient was assessed using posttreatment magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were conducted to identify subregions related to 3-month poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale scores, 3–6) in the reperfusion and medical therapy cohorts, respectively. In addition, prognostic eficiency between the region-based ASPECTS and ASPECTS score methods were compared using receiver operating characteristic curves and DeLong’s test.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0057_s_007"> <title style='display:none'>Results</title> <p>A total of 365 patients (median age, 64 years; 70% men) were included, of whom 169 had poor outcomes. In the reperfusion therapy cohort, multivariable regression analyses revealed that the involvement of the left M4 cortical region in left-hemisphere stroke (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 5.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.53–19.02) and the involvement of the right M3 cortical region in right-hemisphere stroke (aOR 4.21, 95% CI 1.05–16.78) were independently associated with poor functional outcomes. In the medical therapy cohort, left-hemisphere stroke with left M5 cortical region (aOR 2.87, 95% CI 1.08–7.59) and caudate nucleus (aOR 3.14, 95% CI 1.00–9.85) involved and right-hemisphere stroke with right M3 cortical region (aOR 4.15, 95% CI 1.29–8.18) and internal capsule (aOR 3.94, 95% CI 1.22–12.78) affected were related to the increased risks of poststroke disability. In addition, region-based ASPECTS significantly improved the prognostic efficiency compared with the conventional ASPECTS score method.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0057_s_008"> <title style='display:none'>Conclusion</title> <p>The involvement of specific ASPECTS subregions depending on the affected hemisphere was associated with worse functional outcomes 3 months after stroke, and the critical subregion distribution varied by clinical management. Therefore, region-based ASPECTS could provide additional value in guiding individual decision making and neurological recovery in patients with AIS.</p></sec> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00572022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Mesenchymal stem cells and connective tissue diseases: From bench to bedsidehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0028<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>The pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases (CTDs), represented by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), includes various immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are unique due to their regulatory effect on immunity. This makes them a promising therapeutic approach for patients with immune-mediated disorders such as CTD. The safety and clinical efficacy of MSC treatment in CTD have been tested in a growing number of preclinical and clinical studies. Administration of MSCs has consistently shown benefits with both symptomatic and histologic improvement in CTD animal models. MSC therapies in severe and drug-resistant CTD patients have shown promise in a number of the pilot studies, cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials in SLE, RA, and SSc, but some problems still need to be resolved in the transition from the bench to the bedside. The relevant studies in pSS and IIM are still in their infancy, but have displayed encouraging outcomes. Considerable efficacy variations have been observed in terms of the route of delivery, time of MSC injection, origin of the MSCs and dosage. Furthermore, the optimization of conventional drugs combined with MSC therapies and the applications of novel cell engineering approaches requires additional research. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the immunoregulatory mechanism of MSCs, as well as the preclinical and clinical studies of MSC-based therapy for the treatment of CTDs.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00282022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Hypervolemia suppresses dilutional anaemic injury in a rat model of haemodilutionhttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0045<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0045_s_006"> <title style='display:none'>Background and Objectives</title> <p>Haemodilution leads to complications in clinical practice. It is exactly unknown whether this damage is caused by the fluid or by the stretching of the vascular bed. We aimed to compare two different haemodilution techniques at the same anaemic level.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0045_s_007"> <title style='display:none'>Methods</title> <p>Normovolemic or hypervolemic haemodilution was performed on twelve adult male Wistar rats. In the normovolemic procedure, blood was withdrawn and instantaneously administered with similar amounts of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4). Fluid was administered without withdrawing blood in the hypervolemic procedure. In both models, a 25% haematocrit level was targeted and kept at this level for 90 min to deepen the anaemia effect. Besides haemodynamics measurement, renal function (creatinine, blood urea nitrogen) and injury (tissue norepinephrine, malondialdehyde) were evaluated. Also, systemic hypoxia (lactate), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, ischaemia-modified albumin), inflammation (tumour necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α]), osmotic stress, adrenal stress (norepinephrine, epinephrine), and vascular stretching (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]) were assessed.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0045_s_008"> <title style='display:none'>Results</title> <p>Arterial pressure in the normovolemic group was lower than in the hypervolemic group. Serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and lactate levels were higher in the normovolemic group. Tissue norepinephrine and malondialdehyde levels were higher in the normovolemic group. Serum ANP, malondialdehyde, ischaemia-modified albumin, free haemoglobin, syndecan-1, and TNF-α were higher in both groups compared to respective baseline.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0045_s_009"> <title style='display:none'>Conclusions</title> <p>Normovolemic haemodilution may lead to hypoxic kidney injury. The hypervolemic state may be advantageous if fluid is to be administered. Thus, the effect of the fluid itself can be relatively masked.</p></sec> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00452022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Predictors of progression in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies with interstitial lung diseasehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0029<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title><p>The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a group of connective tissue diseases that afect multiple organ systems, including the lungs. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common and heterogeneous complication of IIMs, with its degree ranging from mild to fatal. Thus, it is critical to identify clinical features and validated biomarkers for predicting disease progression and prognosis, which could be beneficial for therapy adjustment. In this review, we discuss predictors for rapid progression of IIM-ILD and propose guidance for disease monitoring and implications of therapy. Systematic screening of myositis-specific antibodies, measuring serum biomarker levels, pulmonary function tests, and chest high-resolution computer tomography will be beneficial for the evaluation of disease progression and prognosis.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00292022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00A comprehensive weighted gene co-expression network analysis uncovers potential targets in diabetic kidney diseasehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0058<abstract><title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0058_s_006"> <title style='display:none'>Background and Objectives</title> <p>Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes. It has always been difficult to explore novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets of DKD. We aimed to identify new biomarkers and further explore their functions in DKD.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0058_s_007"> <title style='display:none'>Methods</title> <p>The weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) method was used to analyze the expression profile data of DKD, obtain key modules related to the clinical traits of DKD, and perform gene enrichment analysis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to verify the mRNA expression of the hub genes in DKD. Spearman’s correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between gene expression and clinical indicators.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0058_s_008"> <title style='display:none'>Results</title> <p>Fifteen gene modules were obtained <italic>via</italic> WGCNA analysis, among which the green module had the most significant correlation with DKD. Gene enrichment analysis revealed that the genes in this module were mainly involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, regulation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) mediated signal transduction, G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathway, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) molecular signaling pathway, Rho protein signal transduction, and oxidoreductase activity. The qRT-PCR results showed that the relative expression of nuclear pore complex-interacting protein family member A2 (<italic>NPIPA2</italic>) and ankyrin repeat domain 36 (<italic>ANKRD36</italic>) was notably increased in DKD compared to the control. <italic>NPIPA2</italic> was positively correlated with the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine (Scr) but negatively correlated with albumin (ALB) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. <italic>ANKRD36</italic> was positively correlated with the triglyceride (TG) level and white blood cell (WBC) count.</p></sec> <sec id="j_jtim-2022-0058_s_009"> <title style='display:none'>Conclusion</title> <p><italic>NPIPA2</italic> expression is closely related to the disease condition of DKD, whereas <italic>ANKRD36</italic> may be involved in the progression of DKD through lipid metabolism and inflammation, providing an experimental basis to further explore the pathogenesis of DKD.</p></sec> </abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00582022-11-15T00:00:00.000+00:00Research progress on N-adenosylate methylation RNA modification in heart failure remodelinghttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-0025<abstract> <title style='display:none'>Abstract</title> <p>Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and death globally. The most common internal modification of mRNA is N<sup>6</sup>-adenosylate methylation (m<sup>6</sup>A). Recently, a growing number of studies have been devoted to researching cardiac remodeling mechanisms, especially m<sup>6</sup>A RNA methylation, revealing a connection between m<sup>6</sup>A and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarized the current understanding regarding m<sup>6</sup>A and elucidated the dynamic modifications of writers, erasers, and readers. Furthermore, we highlighted m<sup>6</sup>A RNA methylation related to cardiac remodeling and summarized its potential mechanisms. Finally, we discussed the potential of m<sup>6</sup>A RNA methylation in the treatment of cardiac remodeling.</p></abstract>ARTICLEtruehttps://sciendo.com/article/10.2478/jtim-2022-00252023-01-05T00:00:00.000+00:00en-us-1